FAQ

How do I interpret CSV FDR data fields that are exported from IntelligenceCenter?

FAQ ID:    FAQ1373
Version:    1.0
Status:    Published
Published date:    05/19/2011
 

Answer

FAQ: IntelligenceCenter FDR Record Definition in CSV Exports

Version 1.0

FAQ:

How do I interpret CSV FDR data fields that are exported from IntelligenceCenter?


BACKGROUND

IntelligenceCenter is capable of exporting its FDR data to a CSV file source. When it does so, there is not a header row providing definition of the two types of files and the header meanings. See. Page 40 through 42 of the “User’s Guide to IntelligenceCenter”  on the usage of the command to generate the CSV file.

An example as is follows:

52,74,  172.26.146.233,49924,222.122.193.70,80,6,2011-02-14 00:43:31,2011-02-14 00:43:36,172,4,0,0,0,0,19,124

To determine which field type is involved, you need to determine whether the successfully exported CSV file is for VoIP Specific or generalized Network Flow Data. Packeteer-2 or NetFlow-5 record source.

Please find the detailed header explanation for each field type below:

A. If the CSV file name starts with f, then the file deals with typical General Network Flow Data, and the comma separated fields in the CSV file are as follows,

1.            Reference Device Class ID

2.            Reference Service ID

3.            Source IP

4.            Source Port

5.            Destination IP

6.            Destination Port

7.            Protocol  ID

8.            Start time

9.            End time

10.          Bytes

11.          Packets

12.          Retransmission bytes

13.          Retransmission Total Delay

14.          Retransmission Server Delay

15.          Retransmission Transaction

16.          TCP Flag

17.          Time to live

B. If the CSV file name starts with V, the FDR flows deals with VoIP data, then the comma separated fields in the CSV file are as follows:

1.            Reference Device Class ID

2.            Source IP                                                                                                                                                          

3.            Destination IP

4.            Start time

5.            End time

6.            Bytes

7.            Packets

8.            VoIP Latency

9.            VoIP Jitter

10.          VoIP Loss

 


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